Enough Already

It’s been 100 days and some change since Donald J. Trump took office and what a ride it’s been, huh? WeeeeEEEEEeeeee--what part of the rickety rollercoaster will we experience today?! As if the constant anxiety due to national security secrets being leaked, underqualified dolts being appointed, and foreign dignitaries being manhandled is not enough for our worn nerves to bear, some on the Left have taken it upon themselves to call for “empathy” and “understanding” for those that voted for and created this (totally foreseeable and completely predictable) mess. Tell me if you’ve heard or read something like this:

“We need to have empathy for people that voted for Trump, they’ve been forgotten and ignored!”

It’s almost like when you eschew and devalue education you are easily conned by fraudsters that shill empty promises and outright lies. Weird. Anyway, here’s why if you are saying things like that you need to stop, and if you are thinking they are right you also need to stop:

 

  1. It’s presumptive. Telling people that they need to have empathy assumes that they don’t have it in the first place. I can feel really, really bad for someone and understand where they are coming from, while also finding them to be 100 percent wrong. So wrong and misguided that they are destructive. Being willfully ignorant and messing up your own life is one thing, messing up the lives of 320 million American people (or really even one or two people) is not ok and never will be.

  2. It’s tone-policing. Anger is an entirely appropriate response when lives and well being are threatened. Especially when it’s your own that is at stake.

  3. It’s inaccurate, revisionist history. White working class people in America have never been ignored or forgotten. Social service programs were created in order to help them. Republican and Democratic campaigns have targeted them in every election since the parties’ inceptions.  

 

Consider this post a demand for accountability. For ownership. Let’s stop infantilizing an entire class of people and start asking that they do better. For themselves and for all of us.