Politics

Russiagate Bloggers

by Morgan W.

So, you want more information about Russiagate, right? We at DGB are also addicted to this story, and not ashamed to indulge.

It’s easy for information to get buried in the frenetic news cycle scrambling to cover all the crazy of this administration, so some of us turn to independent journalists and contributors to supplement our usual Amazon Washington Post and Failing New York Times articles with juicy conspiracies.

The “news before the news” happens on Twitter, so we’ve compiled some relevant accounts for you to follow.

 

For a legal take, follow Seth Abramson @SethAbramson. His threads can be long and fairly complex, but he breaks down the information well, and is generally considered to be reliable. Abramson is a poet, professor, and former attorney.

 

Bill Palmer @PalmerReport has had some high-profile shares, leading to debate over the veracity of his claims. His website is well-staffed, mysterious, and increasingly popular. http://www.palmerreport.com/

 

If you like a generous splash of Crazy with your Trump hate, follow Louise Mensch @LouiseMensch. She’s a novelist and former Member of British Parliament, who now publishes mainly on her blog https://patribotics.blog/. Confirmation bias will help you validate her reporting if you decide to go in this direction. Grain of salt and all that.

 

If you find Louise is too “hysterical”, follow Claude Taylor @TrueFactsStated for the exact same conspiracies delivered to you by a safer, more male narrator. Taylor is a contributor to both Patribotics and Palmer Report and apparently worked with the Clintons once upon a time.

 

We find John Schindler @20committee is a good middle ground between conspiracy and facts. He touts an impressive intelligence community history, including with the NSA. https://20committee.com/

 

Other interesting posters to follow include

@Khanoisseur

@RVAwonk

@TheRickWilson

@sarahkendzior

 

Infighting between accounts is fairly common and can be distracting, with various attempts to discredit other accounts’ tweets/careers/patriotism/character. Please keep in mind that verified accounts (with a blue check mark) do not indicate that Twitter endorses the content of their tweets, just that the person is who they claim to be. People using Twitter can still spread false information and DGB doesn’t take a position on the credulity of any of these sources. We recommend you consume all media judiciously. There’s a line between Trump hate dance parties and actual news, but it’s blurry these days. If you try on enough tin foil hats, a few are bound to fit, but don’t get too carried away.

 

Enough Already

It’s been 100 days and some change since Donald J. Trump took office and what a ride it’s been, huh? WeeeeEEEEEeeeee--what part of the rickety rollercoaster will we experience today?! As if the constant anxiety due to national security secrets being leaked, underqualified dolts being appointed, and foreign dignitaries being manhandled is not enough for our worn nerves to bear, some on the Left have taken it upon themselves to call for “empathy” and “understanding” for those that voted for and created this (totally foreseeable and completely predictable) mess. Tell me if you’ve heard or read something like this:

“We need to have empathy for people that voted for Trump, they’ve been forgotten and ignored!”

It’s almost like when you eschew and devalue education you are easily conned by fraudsters that shill empty promises and outright lies. Weird. Anyway, here’s why if you are saying things like that you need to stop, and if you are thinking they are right you also need to stop:

 

  1. It’s presumptive. Telling people that they need to have empathy assumes that they don’t have it in the first place. I can feel really, really bad for someone and understand where they are coming from, while also finding them to be 100 percent wrong. So wrong and misguided that they are destructive. Being willfully ignorant and messing up your own life is one thing, messing up the lives of 320 million American people (or really even one or two people) is not ok and never will be.

  2. It’s tone-policing. Anger is an entirely appropriate response when lives and well being are threatened. Especially when it’s your own that is at stake.

  3. It’s inaccurate, revisionist history. White working class people in America have never been ignored or forgotten. Social service programs were created in order to help them. Republican and Democratic campaigns have targeted them in every election since the parties’ inceptions.  

 

Consider this post a demand for accountability. For ownership. Let’s stop infantilizing an entire class of people and start asking that they do better. For themselves and for all of us.