2016 Election

Enough Already

It’s been 100 days and some change since Donald J. Trump took office and what a ride it’s been, huh? WeeeeEEEEEeeeee--what part of the rickety rollercoaster will we experience today?! As if the constant anxiety due to national security secrets being leaked, underqualified dolts being appointed, and foreign dignitaries being manhandled is not enough for our worn nerves to bear, some on the Left have taken it upon themselves to call for “empathy” and “understanding” for those that voted for and created this (totally foreseeable and completely predictable) mess. Tell me if you’ve heard or read something like this:

“We need to have empathy for people that voted for Trump, they’ve been forgotten and ignored!”

It’s almost like when you eschew and devalue education you are easily conned by fraudsters that shill empty promises and outright lies. Weird. Anyway, here’s why if you are saying things like that you need to stop, and if you are thinking they are right you also need to stop:

 

  1. It’s presumptive. Telling people that they need to have empathy assumes that they don’t have it in the first place. I can feel really, really bad for someone and understand where they are coming from, while also finding them to be 100 percent wrong. So wrong and misguided that they are destructive. Being willfully ignorant and messing up your own life is one thing, messing up the lives of 320 million American people (or really even one or two people) is not ok and never will be.

  2. It’s tone-policing. Anger is an entirely appropriate response when lives and well being are threatened. Especially when it’s your own that is at stake.

  3. It’s inaccurate, revisionist history. White working class people in America have never been ignored or forgotten. Social service programs were created in order to help them. Republican and Democratic campaigns have targeted them in every election since the parties’ inceptions.  

 

Consider this post a demand for accountability. For ownership. Let’s stop infantilizing an entire class of people and start asking that they do better. For themselves and for all of us.

 

Election Isolation

by Anonymous

I am one of the very few people in my gigantic family that voted for Hillary Clinton. It leaves me feeling very isolated, but also very angry. I live thousands of miles away from almost all of my family and my only contact was through social media and texts and all of that has stopped, thanks to the election of the Hostess Orange Cupcake. I have also unfriended or unfollowed many former friends and family over the election. I understand that I am isolating myself in my little “snowflake” liberal bubble, but I have to. If I don’t, I will spend all of my waking hours fighting online, and I have too much work to do.

I don’t know how to reconcile how angry I am with everyone who voted for Trump, or said that Trump and Hillary were the same, and I am sure that includes many family members. It feels like the world is absolutely crumbling around us and I don’t blame just Donald Trump, I blame them. How could they have been so naive? Were they even naive or did they just not care, or, even worse, were they racist and sexist and I never knew, and they wanted these things to happen? How do you find out? Do you ask your family “so hey, about those Muslim bans, are you cool with them?” How do you even know if people support the things Trump is currently doing when everyone I know who is not actively fighting against Trump has gone completely silent. I see your silence and it scares me.

This election has been very isolating, but it has also been very freeing. It has has given me more courage to say the things I want to say on my own Facebook wall, without the fear of repercussions that previously stopped me from posting political stuff because I know my family and friends just won't say anything about it.

To all my high school friends, living in the same small town, posting about how they don’t care about politics: I see you. I’ll care about politics so that you don’t have to. To all of my female family members and old church friends who say the March wasn’t for them: I see you. I marched because you didn’t know you should. To everyone else who isn’t absolutely terrified of Donald Trump: I see you. I am scared enough for all of us and I will fight because you don't know you should.

I see you.