Trump

Russiagate Bloggers

by Morgan W.

So, you want more information about Russiagate, right? We at DGB are also addicted to this story, and not ashamed to indulge.

It’s easy for information to get buried in the frenetic news cycle scrambling to cover all the crazy of this administration, so some of us turn to independent journalists and contributors to supplement our usual Amazon Washington Post and Failing New York Times articles with juicy conspiracies.

The “news before the news” happens on Twitter, so we’ve compiled some relevant accounts for you to follow.

 

For a legal take, follow Seth Abramson @SethAbramson. His threads can be long and fairly complex, but he breaks down the information well, and is generally considered to be reliable. Abramson is a poet, professor, and former attorney.

 

Bill Palmer @PalmerReport has had some high-profile shares, leading to debate over the veracity of his claims. His website is well-staffed, mysterious, and increasingly popular. http://www.palmerreport.com/

 

If you like a generous splash of Crazy with your Trump hate, follow Louise Mensch @LouiseMensch. She’s a novelist and former Member of British Parliament, who now publishes mainly on her blog https://patribotics.blog/. Confirmation bias will help you validate her reporting if you decide to go in this direction. Grain of salt and all that.

 

If you find Louise is too “hysterical”, follow Claude Taylor @TrueFactsStated for the exact same conspiracies delivered to you by a safer, more male narrator. Taylor is a contributor to both Patribotics and Palmer Report and apparently worked with the Clintons once upon a time.

 

We find John Schindler @20committee is a good middle ground between conspiracy and facts. He touts an impressive intelligence community history, including with the NSA. https://20committee.com/

 

Other interesting posters to follow include

@Khanoisseur

@RVAwonk

@TheRickWilson

@sarahkendzior

 

Infighting between accounts is fairly common and can be distracting, with various attempts to discredit other accounts’ tweets/careers/patriotism/character. Please keep in mind that verified accounts (with a blue check mark) do not indicate that Twitter endorses the content of their tweets, just that the person is who they claim to be. People using Twitter can still spread false information and DGB doesn’t take a position on the credulity of any of these sources. We recommend you consume all media judiciously. There’s a line between Trump hate dance parties and actual news, but it’s blurry these days. If you try on enough tin foil hats, a few are bound to fit, but don’t get too carried away.

 

Enough Already

It’s been 100 days and some change since Donald J. Trump took office and what a ride it’s been, huh? WeeeeEEEEEeeeee--what part of the rickety rollercoaster will we experience today?! As if the constant anxiety due to national security secrets being leaked, underqualified dolts being appointed, and foreign dignitaries being manhandled is not enough for our worn nerves to bear, some on the Left have taken it upon themselves to call for “empathy” and “understanding” for those that voted for and created this (totally foreseeable and completely predictable) mess. Tell me if you’ve heard or read something like this:

“We need to have empathy for people that voted for Trump, they’ve been forgotten and ignored!”

It’s almost like when you eschew and devalue education you are easily conned by fraudsters that shill empty promises and outright lies. Weird. Anyway, here’s why if you are saying things like that you need to stop, and if you are thinking they are right you also need to stop:

 

  1. It’s presumptive. Telling people that they need to have empathy assumes that they don’t have it in the first place. I can feel really, really bad for someone and understand where they are coming from, while also finding them to be 100 percent wrong. So wrong and misguided that they are destructive. Being willfully ignorant and messing up your own life is one thing, messing up the lives of 320 million American people (or really even one or two people) is not ok and never will be.

  2. It’s tone-policing. Anger is an entirely appropriate response when lives and well being are threatened. Especially when it’s your own that is at stake.

  3. It’s inaccurate, revisionist history. White working class people in America have never been ignored or forgotten. Social service programs were created in order to help them. Republican and Democratic campaigns have targeted them in every election since the parties’ inceptions.  

 

Consider this post a demand for accountability. For ownership. Let’s stop infantilizing an entire class of people and start asking that they do better. For themselves and for all of us.

 

Americans Resisting Overseas in the Trump Era: Backburner Activism or the Next Best Thing?

by the Americans Resisting Overseas Team

The Women’s March on Washington revealed the power and commitment of Americans living overseas to exercise their citizenship and participate in the current political struggle from outside the USA. By simply adding an international registration option to their online platform, millions signed up to march in over 50 countries. The global ‘’huddles’’ that mushroomed from the DC Sister marches represent a living experiment for transnational citizenship in the Trump era.

Despite this great success in overseas mobilization, other United States based social movements have not followed suit. The absence of international registration options on the wonderful ACLU People Power and RISE Stronger grassroots platforms are indicative of the absence of Americans living overseas’ voices and visibility in the current political context. While the Women’s Global Marches proved that Americans living outside the USA are willing to be politically active, they still remain largely under the radar and underutilized by US advocacy efforts as a whole.

Although not everyone has caught on to the fact that Americans living overseas have the potential to be an important political force, there has never been a better time to exercise transnational citizenship. This is the reason we set up the online platform Americans Resisting Overseas, as a space to support Americans overseas in exercising active citizenship through mobilizing, learning and sharing actions with others from outside the USA.

Today, as an American migrant who has lived in Medellin, Colombia for six years, I, like so many others in the world, receive news of what is going on in the USA as it happens through social media. I can volunteer for US NGOs “remotely’’, make cheap overseas calls to my Members of Congress via Skype, mail postcards to the White House that will arrive within 14 days, participate in public policy webinars, receive online civil rights trainings, participate in global marches, and coordinate with other activists through SLACK, all from outside the United States. Not only can I connect with my own country, but I can, in a second, coordinate with other American activists living overseas in dozens of other countries through apps like WhatsApp.

This is transnational citizenship at its height, the ability to be both here, the country where we currently live, and there, the country where we come from.

Why then has American overseas activism been left at the fringe? For one thing, American citizenship is still too often associated with physical borders, versus a sense of belonging, participation, and identity which can be nurtured regardless of the physical territory where we live. Indicative of this, is the fact that Americans living overseas did not even gain the right to an absentee ballot vote until the Overseas Voting act of 1975.

The case for including Americans living overseas in activism is not helped by the fact that there are not any real numbers on how many Americans live outside the USA. Estimates guess between 2 and 7 million, somewhere between the size of the population of Rhode Island and Tennessee.

Some might argue that another reason for the distance of Americans abroad from US politics is that many Americans living overseas left the US in order to escape American systems. Some of the strongest lobbying efforts that have historically emerged from the Americans resisting overseas movement have been around taxes, versus in defense of rights.

However, these are not ordinary times and the current political situation has motivated American migrants who otherwise would not become involved to mobilize, politicize, and stay active.

2 to 7 million people…How can this political power be put to use by the organizing efforts in the United States? I would venture that the responsibility is two-fold. On one hand, the movements in the States should be aware of how transnational citizenship can come into play in influencing public policy. We no longer live in a world where physical borders determine our ability to participate. Today overseas Americans can boycott Ivanka products and jam their MoC’s phone lines with the same ease as someone from within the States.

On the other hand, Americans living overseas must become better organized, find each other, and connect and form alliances, not just with other Americans but with activists from the countries in which they are living who almost certainly are also being harmed by the current administration’s policies. The establishment of online platforms such as Americans Resisting Overseas based out of Colombia, Progressive Action Global Exchange reaching countries in Africa, the Middle East and Europe, Solidarity for Humanity in Switzerland, and American Expats for Positive Change in the UK are just some of many groups that have begun to take important steps towards making visible what is happening from abroad and working collaboratively with others to organize against the current administration from outside the USA.

Advocating for social change is complex. Trying to understand what works and what doesn’t from outside the United States adds an extra level of complexity. But, like millions of other Americans living overseas, I am willing to be part of this living political experiment. I, along with others, will be organizing and making enough noise from outside the USA for Trump and my representatives to hear me, even from all the way across the ocean.

 

Americans Resisting Overseas is a platform to share experiences of American activism overseas in the Trump era and inspire others to take action from outside the USA.

 

Election Isolation

by Anonymous

I am one of the very few people in my gigantic family that voted for Hillary Clinton. It leaves me feeling very isolated, but also very angry. I live thousands of miles away from almost all of my family and my only contact was through social media and texts and all of that has stopped, thanks to the election of the Hostess Orange Cupcake. I have also unfriended or unfollowed many former friends and family over the election. I understand that I am isolating myself in my little “snowflake” liberal bubble, but I have to. If I don’t, I will spend all of my waking hours fighting online, and I have too much work to do.

I don’t know how to reconcile how angry I am with everyone who voted for Trump, or said that Trump and Hillary were the same, and I am sure that includes many family members. It feels like the world is absolutely crumbling around us and I don’t blame just Donald Trump, I blame them. How could they have been so naive? Were they even naive or did they just not care, or, even worse, were they racist and sexist and I never knew, and they wanted these things to happen? How do you find out? Do you ask your family “so hey, about those Muslim bans, are you cool with them?” How do you even know if people support the things Trump is currently doing when everyone I know who is not actively fighting against Trump has gone completely silent. I see your silence and it scares me.

This election has been very isolating, but it has also been very freeing. It has has given me more courage to say the things I want to say on my own Facebook wall, without the fear of repercussions that previously stopped me from posting political stuff because I know my family and friends just won't say anything about it.

To all my high school friends, living in the same small town, posting about how they don’t care about politics: I see you. I’ll care about politics so that you don’t have to. To all of my female family members and old church friends who say the March wasn’t for them: I see you. I marched because you didn’t know you should. To everyone else who isn’t absolutely terrified of Donald Trump: I see you. I am scared enough for all of us and I will fight because you don't know you should.

I see you.


 

A Woman Scorned

by Morgan W.

Being cheated on was the best thing that ever happened to me. After seven years of marriage and two kids, my relationship was struck by the breathtakingly violent force of infidelity. The affair had been going on for more than a year. I had a four year old and a one year old at home. I cried and vomited. I laid on the floor and I wanted to die. I hated myself and my spouse. Weeks later, when I surfaced for air, I looked at our lives and I decided to stay.

I took stock of the aftermath. There were huge piles of anger and the trust was shattered to pieces. Everything we had built together lay demolished at my feet. I don’t know why I didn’t give up. It would have been easier, certainly, but I found someone inside myself who was more willful and fierce than I could have imagined. A woman I hadn't met until then. So, fragment by fragment, I rebuilt. It was much more difficult than building the relationship the first time, but I was determined. I had been tested and I wasn’t about to fail. Almost everyone in my life told me to leave, save for a few women who had, themselves, stayed. So, although I sat in the courthouse parking lot more than a few times, I never did file for divorce, and the continued success of my marriage is one of my greatest accomplishments to date. We went on to have another baby and I became a serious distance runner. In the years after the affair, I discovered I could do absolutely anything.

Every day post-election pretty much feels like the weeks following my discovery of the affair. The blanket of depression is occasionally thrown aside by a surge of rage-empowerment and I finally get off the couch. Then I read about another Cabinet appointment or something Kellyanne Conway said and I slink back into the familiar covering. Which feeling will win out? Depends on my frame of mind when you ask, I guess. I’m committed to my marriage and I'm in it for life. I like to think of my country the same way. What it’s done to my family hurts like hell, though.

It’s estimated that up to 60 percent of marriages will be affected by infidelity. It can happen to anyone. It can happen if you are attractive, successful, a perfect Pinterest mother who does whatever it is that you’re supposed to do with shaving cream this week. It can happen if your husband is the president of the United States. As much as I tried to insulate myself from it during the campaign, I saw the memes and heard the derogatory attacks based on Bill’s philandering. If Hillary couldn't keep her husband satisfied, she couldn't handle America. Monica got the job done when Hillary couldn't. Bill chose other women over Hillary and the country should too. More puns on the word "blow" than I care to recount.

Aside from the misogyny and tastelessness of these attacks, I believe the opposite is true. Marital strife has only strengthened Hillary and made the Clinton marriage a force to be reckoned with. Every couple should feel they can take on the world together, but few literally do. People spend a lot of time speculating on why she stayed. It doesn't really matter to me if she loves him or if she's holding him hostage for the rest of his life, Gone Girl-style, or a bit of both. I would guess that everything that has happened in their marriage, has, like all successful marriages, made both of them better and stronger. I like to imagine that he has paid a personal price for his mistakes higher than impeachment or even being the subject of a Beyoncé album, but that’s my own revenge fantasy. Ultimately, we know very little about Hillary’s marriage, or any marriage besides one we’ve actually been in. What we do know for certain is that Hillary is strong as hell, which we see in her post-affair evolution. She rose like a phoenix from the ashes of a fire, witnessed by basically the whole world with access to television, many of whom were merrily roasting marshmallows around it. She thrust herself into the public eye again and again, doggedly pursuing her political career. The story of Hillary as a wife and as a person isn’t about being a victim or an “enabler,” which is also a popular way to deride her for staying. It’s about the might of commitment, perseverance, and unwavering ambition. It’s about turning powerlessness into dominating inner strength. Sure, maybe she already knew she could shatter every glass ceiling she came up against. Maybe she never once doubted she could take on the world. Or maybe, like me and so many other dedicated women I know, she's driven to accomplish the things she has in part because he cheated, and she stayed.

Around 62 million people voted for Donald Trump in last year’s election, stunning so many of us. I often ask myself how Hillary soldiers on, especially now. Somehow she won the votes and still lost, but doesn't seem to have wavered. Does she ever cry like I do or has she figured out a way to harness the power of political victimization the same way she channeled her personal hurt? More importantly, do I have that woman inside me still? I desperately want to take for myself just a tiny piece of her badassery for this resistance. As DGB staff, I try to do all the good I can every day. Like so many other women right now, I want this to be when I rise up and fight like never before. As the saying goes: Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned. But what about a woman scorned by her country? How much fury and strength will she find inside herself then? And I'm not talking about Hillary. I'm talking about me.