Body Image

Stop Commenting on People’s Bodies

Your DGB for today is to help stop society’s running commentary on the human body.

Have you been a victim or perpetrator of the old gaffe where one person assumes that a woman is pregnant and then turns out to be wrong? The heart of those terribly awkward exchanges is the notion that it’s totally cool to turn an observation regarding someone’s body into speech. It’s actually rude, can be very hurtful, and contributes to toxic notions about food/eating, weight, and beauty. That example is an obvious one but it’s still not okay, even in other instances. What if your coworker looks thinner and you want to compliment them? Nope. You may have no idea why they have lost weight or even that they actually wanted to. What if you notice that someone looks tired and you want to say something in solidarity? Just don’t. You can express sympathy or empathy without making people feel self-conscious.

We encourage you to read a couple of articles or blog posts about this topic and make a commitment to being a kinder, more sensitive person. Some suggestions below:

 

https://medium.com/@Jacqui_84/stop-commenting-on-peoples-bodies-it-s-rude-ec11d02a3db8

 

http://thoughtcatalog.com/francesca-saunders/2014/01/on-body-image-why-we-need-to-stop-commenting-on-size/

 

 

Hey Hey, Ho Ho, Fat-Shaming Has Got to Go!*

Your DGB for today is to go to read this piece on fat-shaming, and about the Dove Self-Esteem Project here.

We’ve heard a lot about fat-shaming in the media recently - partially because our very own (gag, breathe, gag) president has been an enthusiastic participant, and partially because as a culture we are starting to say “hell, naw” to policing and shaming bodies. Some defend fat-shaming as a way to get others to abandon their unhealthy ways and lose weight. Not only is this disingenuous (see: “concern trolling”), but it is also completely ineffective. Scientists now confirm that humiliating people about weight only results in…humiliated people.

Dove offers several ways to get involved in promoting body positivity, but one of our favorites is this mindfulness activity meant for girls 11-14 (though it was well-received by DGB kids as young as 8.)

Fat shaming is as out of style as cake pops, YOLO, and planking. It’s 2017 and it’s all about body positivity.

 

*We just got back from the Women’s March and we’re still fired up and in March-mode.